Reading Slumps Are Tough, So Don’t Read

Reading Slumps Are Tough, So Don’t Read

After finishing A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza, I’ve been having the worst book slump ever. It might be because I’ve spent the last month and a half trying to read all the books I have for various projects this summer. Usually, I like to spread these out throughout the months to come so that I’m not bogged down with required reading.

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Speak No Evil by Uzodinma Iweala

Speak No Evil by Uzodinma Iweala

I haven’t read a book that made me mad in a really long time. I’m glad that this book was the break from that. When I get mad at a book that’s really good, it’s because of how it all played out and what the outcome of everyone’s actions led to. It’s been a really long time since I felt this way and honestly, I appreciate the anger.

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March 2018 Bookish Wrap Up

March 2018 Bookish Wrap Up

Quick update: I’ll be heading out on vacation this week and I won’t be posting as often as I do. I’ll be back later this month with stories and new books to share!

I can’t believe that another month has come and gone. I’ve always regarded March to be the longest month. This is probably leftover from school when March has no days off. It just felt longer because of that.

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Love, Hate, and Other Filters by Samira Ahmed

Love, Hate, and Other Filters by Samira Ahmed

As I write this, I’m also reading an article about how a 19-year-old girl was attacked at her local hospital. She was wearing her hijab and a 57-year-old man came up from behind her and proceeded to punch her repeatedly in the back of her head. Why?

The article doesn’t go into the details as to why, but the assumption is because of Islamophobia. Islamophobia is this prejudice and fear that because someone is Muslim that they’re automatically going to be a terrorist.

Islamophobia exists and it is the cruelest and most unkind form of racism. Samira Ahmed covers it perfectly in Love, Hate, and Other Filters. 

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Little Reads – March 16, 2018

Little Reads is a weekly blog post dedicated to short stories or essays I find interesting online. They may be older posts or they may have published recently, but you will always find a link to those posts and my opinions here.

First off, while this isn’t a short story or an essay, I did want to share this amazing obituary written about the late Stephen Hawking. I’m not a physicist or have an interest in learning physics, but I admire this man. Despite the lengths his body endured through his sickness he continued to study and create many new theories. His contributions to science and physics help to bring more answers to what the meaning of the universe is. I even learned a little bit about the Hawking radiation, which is aptly named after him.

Now that he’s even more a part of the fabric of the universe, I read this amazing obituary from the New York Times about what he was able to accomplish in his life with Lou Gehrig’s disease. It’s a pretty lengthy article highlighting many accomplishments of his life and some of it was a bit difficult to grasp because of the science, but still I would strongly recommend skimming.

The main thing they talk about here is his work with black holes. According to this and his theory, he believed that black holes not only sucked in a lot of materials, but it also radiated some materials back. I’ve read a lot of Science Fiction to know that a black hole is nothing but destruction. If I’m correct in this (and I’m probably not because I’m not a physicist), Stephen Hawking’s theory means that what we believed to be this swirling death hole not only destroys but creates. I mean, if you’re a scientist, that’s something big right?

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Image from Lit Hub website: https://lithub.com/esme-weijun-wang-finds-her-way-back-to-a-beloved-childhood-dish/

The second article I found was this beautiful one written by Esme Weijun Wang and her struggle with her chronic illness. She talks about her fight with Lyme disease and how that’s essentially made her gluten-sensitive. She then goes into discussing the joys of enjoying a bowl of noodles from Taiwan and how that made her feel terrible and the adaptations we all have to make when trying to survive.

I resonate so much with this article. Ever since finding out that I have chronic Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism, I try my best to stay gluten and dairy free. I mean, I do have my weak moments where I get a cheeseburger or whip up a batch of my homemade mac and cheese, but I can never eat gluten and dairy regularly to keep my thyroid and body as healthy as I can.

But there’s so many things I miss from my childhood and a lot of that includes food from Asian countries. While my symptoms when eating these foods aren’t as bad (I get a slight headache), I still feel the sacrifices you have to make in order to stay alive. I have to sacrifice a little bit of my own heritage so that I can continue to maintain my body without ups and downs of thyroid issues.

And it kills me sometimes. I would do anything for a giant bowl of noodles but I also know that I’m better off with some meat, veg, and a bowl of rice.

We all have to make sacrifices and you can meet those sacrifices with a positive attitude and you can have that bowl of noodles. It can taste exactly like home despite the minor changes you had to make.

If you have any little reads to suggest, contact me and let me know! I would love to read your little reads.

Little Reads – March 9, 2018

Happy Friday everyone!

I’ve decided that I’m going to take my favorite links from the Internet series and turn it into a spotlight on short stories and essays I find. I’ll be featuring one or two articles at the end of the week in a new series I like to call Little Reads. 

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Image from Catapult article by Shing Yin Kor

Today’s article is a little comic I found on Catapult’s page. It’s a beautiful story about a young woman who expresses her love and appreciation for people in the only way she knows how; through cooking food.

This story resonated so much with me both as a food person and because my family was never openly hugging or kissing each other. We were reserved people that really only know how to love by feeding each other. If it’s through a beautifully home-cooked meal or at a restaurant, we are always making sure that the ones we love are fed.

It reminds me of this “thing” that we do. When you love someone, you put a little food on their plate. It could be a piece of chicken or even just a pickle, but the simple act of putting some food on a plate is like saying you love them without the words. You want to see them eat and make sure that they are healthy and fed.

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Hope you enjoy this literary snack! Have a great weekend!

If you have any short stories or essays you’d like to see featured, reach out to me at simonelikesbooks [at] gmail dot com.